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The Community's Collective Wisdom "Scotland Yard was really no wiser on the subject than it was 15 years ago.."-F.G.Abberline,1903. The question is...are we ?

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Old May 2nd, 2015, 04:41 PM   #11
Alan Baird
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Hello,
Thanks for the census information as it shows the whole family helped his wife, 'Emma and their children,' through the difficult times and that was one of the big questions I was interested in finding the answer to.
When William Henry Townsend was sentenced by the court, he was given a Criminal Lunacy Number of A54911, for the charge of 'Threat to Murder,' dated the 1st of June 1893 and he was to be detained at Holloway but the Governor was responsible for transferring him to Broadmoor.
The second document I have seen is the Patient Admission Register for 1846 - 1912 and this states that William Henry Townsend [admission no 41883] was admitted to Wandsworth Asylum [reads Wansdth on the document] on the 20/12/1898 and his date of discharge was 28/1/1899, having been classified as, 'recovered.'
Therefore it seems they moved him from the high security Broadmoor to Wandsworth, as part of the rehabilitation process.
Something must have happened between 1899 and 1911, to send him back to Broadmoor and possibly something serious?

One other interesting point, is that from the very beginning William Henry Townsend admitted he had fired the revolver but he always maintained he never tried to shot the Policeman and I think the authorities must have believed this or he would have been indicted under more serious charges.
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Old May 2nd, 2015, 05:42 PM   #12
Robert Linford
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Hi Alan

I have just found him in Broadmoor during the 1901 census, so it seems that he wasn't at liberty for very long before being banged up again. It needn't have been anything very serious that he did - if he was clearly a lunatic, then he may have been sent back to Broadmoor for a fairly trivial crime.
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Old May 2nd, 2015, 06:05 PM   #13
Alan Baird
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That is great Robert and can I ask you what might seem a daft question. How did you find him in the 1901 and 1911 census records......did you do it through a census search or did you get him through something like the National Archives patient/lunatic records. I just can seem to find him and it is so frustrating.

Alan
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Old May 2nd, 2015, 06:24 PM   #14
Robert Linford
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Hi Alan

I did it through Find My Past and Ancestry. With Ancestry, a search for W as forename and T as surname, perhaps with Berkshire selected as a county, will bring him up in both 1901 and 1911. With Find My Past you can do the same thing for 1911, but there doesn't seem to be any easy way to bring him up on Find My Past for 1901. All sites have their foibles.
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Old May 2nd, 2015, 06:46 PM   #15
Robert Linford
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Alan if you want to find him in 1901 on Find My Past, type in 103 for folio and 1164 for piece number.
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Old May 2nd, 2015, 07:00 PM   #16
Debra Arif
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Originally Posted by Robert Linford View Post
Hi Alan

I did it through Find My Past and Ancestry. With Ancestry, a search for W as forename and T as surname, perhaps with Berkshire selected as a county, will bring him up in both 1901 and 1911. With Find My Past you can do the same thing for 1911, but there doesn't seem to be any easy way to bring him up on Find My Past for 1901. All sites have their foibles.
Robert is very good at it is why! But as a tip I'd say- occupation, where known (in this case 'gun*') seems to work best for FMP if you have one other thing like birthplace county etc.
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Old May 2nd, 2015, 07:14 PM   #17
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Robert is very good at it is why!
Not to say you aren't, Alan. Sorry.
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Old May 3rd, 2015, 06:39 AM   #18
Alan Baird
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Hi Robert and Debra.
I just wanted to say, I think you guys are brilliant and over a few hours, you have provided me with me with information and help to complete the story. This is the only forum I am with and it is a pleasure to use it.

Alan.
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Old May 3rd, 2015, 07:06 AM   #19
Robert Linford
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Thanks Alan. You're welcome.
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Old May 3rd, 2015, 07:14 AM   #20
Alan Baird
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Hi,
There is one other piece of information that I meant to give, as I think it is food for thought.
George Liversedge, gun maker and manufacturer and William Henry Townsend's employer for approximately 3 years, stated at the trial, that the revolver used in the crime was probably from his stock but this could not be proved.
Quote ''The chance of shooting straight with such a revolver is remote, it might or might not hit at 5 yards - it is more a toy - the price of it would be about 8s 6d or 10s 6d.'' George Liversedge then went on to point out, that in the stock of revolvers available to William, there were some of the most accurate, powerful and deadly revolvers, that were on the market. Why did he not pick one of these?
The jury asked the question ''could this toy kill'' and he had to answer, ''yes, if you got close enough.''
William was known to be an intelligent man and had worked with guns for 3 years....why pick the worse revolver in the stock?
Alan..........
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