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The Community's Collective Wisdom "Scotland Yard was really no wiser on the subject than it was 15 years ago.."-F.G.Abberline,1903. The question is...are we ?

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Old December 23rd, 2016, 06:51 PM   #11
Alan Baird
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Hello Rob,
The coverage of the incident by the, ''Illustrated Police News,'' is brilliant.

Obviously, it was a very big story at the time but even after 104 years the drawings are really effective in giving you an idea/sense of what it must have been like on that November night.

The thought of an artist drawing the sketches of the people and scenes involved and then the printing of that work in a publication, gives it a nice personal touch especially as nowadays everything is just instant photographs.


many thanks for that,
Alan.
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Old December 23rd, 2016, 07:45 PM   #12
Rob Clack
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Originally Posted by Alan Baird View Post
Hello Rob,
The coverage of the incident by the, ''Illustrated Police News,'' is brilliant.

Obviously, it was a very big story at the time but even after 104 years the drawings are really effective in giving you an idea/sense of what it must have been like on that November night.

The thought of an artist drawing the sketches of the people and scenes involved and then the printing of that work in a publication, gives it a nice personal touch especially as nowadays everything is just instant photographs.


many thanks for that,
Alan.
Your welcome Alan.
The house is still standing and has a Blue Plaque on it.

http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/v...ward-1850-1931

Regards

Rob
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Old December 26th, 2016, 03:50 PM   #13
Alan Baird
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Thank you Rob for highlighting the link to the blue plaque on Sir Edward Henry's house and did you notice the iron fencing around the front of the house appears to be of the same design as that shown in the Illustrated Police news of 1912. This means the artist was quite exact in his illustration of the scene.

Anyway, I did not realise how famous and successful Sir Edward Henry was as a Commissioner in the Metropolitan Police.
It turns out only 13 years after the Jack the Ripper murders, as Assistant Commissioner [1/7/1901] C.I.D. he introduced the ''Metropolitan Police Fingerprint Bureau.'' He was an expert in the field of fingerprint analysis. I read somewhere that the main purpose for introducing fingerprints, in those days, was to prevent criminals from hiding their previous court and prison convictions.

He introduced the use of Police dogs into the service, unlike Warren's attempt to use bloodhounds in 1888 and he also introduced typewriters in to Scotland Yard etc.

Alan.
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Old January 4th, 2017, 07:14 PM   #14
Alan Baird
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Default SPS = 4 chevrons

Hi,
This is just a small point that many people will already know about but I did not realize the obvious difference between a 'Station Police Sergeant' and a 'Police Sergeant' and that is :-

Station Police Sergeant Walter Ford had 4 chevrons indicating his rank while a Police Sergeant only has 3 chevrons. I must admit the 4 chevron rank marking looked a bit strange when I first noticed it.

bye,
Alan.
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Old January 6th, 2017, 04:33 PM   #15
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Hi,
This is just a small point that many people will already know about but I did not realize the obvious difference between a 'Station Police Sergeant' and a 'Police Sergeant' and that is :-

Station Police Sergeant Walter Ford had 4 chevrons indicating his rank while a Police Sergeant only has 3 chevrons. I must admit the 4 chevron rank marking looked a bit strange when I first noticed it.

bye,
Alan.
The 4 chevrons were replaced by 3 chevrons and a crown in the early 1900s.

Station sergeants had the responsibility to the whole station, whereas sergeants to a section.

Monty
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Old January 6th, 2017, 05:20 PM   #16
Howard Brown
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Thanks for that, Neil...
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Old January 9th, 2017, 09:17 AM   #17
Alan Baird
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Default Thanks on two counts.

Hi,
The last couple of days have been quite busy and I have been away and so my apologies for this late, 'thank you' to Monty for the information on the chevrons.

Therefore I can now confirm 'SPS Walter Ford' would have had his rank indicated by three chevrons and a crown and because of his rank he must have played a major role in the running and administration of the Public Carriage Department.

But that chevron information has also helped me on another topic............

I recently came into the possession of an original old black and white, Metropolitan Police, 11.5 x 8 inches photograph which records a retirement presentation.
On a table you can clearly identify 2 mantlepiece clocks with the columns, 1 three piece crystal decanter set and wooden carrying holder and one large box of fancy cutlery
There are 6 rows of mainly uniformed Police officers, approximately 90 officers and some of which are obviously part of the divisional band.
The presentation took place in an open area in Amoy Place which means it is at Lime Street Police Station and they are part of 'K' or Bow division.
There is no date recorded for this presentation gathering.

Now for the good part..........[thanks Monty]..........I can easily identify Station Police Sergeants in the photograph and so I now suspect the photograph probably dates from sometime between the 1890's to early 1900's.

My daughter has borrowed my camera, otherwise I would have had a go at placing the photograph in this reply. I will attempt to get it back. The original photograph is faded but the digital copy is really quite good.

It is amazing how one piece of knowledge leads to another.

bye Alan.

Last edited by Alan Baird; January 9th, 2017 at 09:21 AM. Reason: repeated info
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