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Assorted Congratulations Forum for plaudits and kudos for all occasions

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Old October 11th, 2014, 06:56 PM   #41
Tracy Ianson
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Hi Tim

I am still chuckling writing this.
The dog's have also removed themselves from sitting with me on the couch and are glaring at me from the corner of the room as I was laughing so much I disturbed them. Poor judge 3 - wonder if he is still with us!

Tracy
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Old October 11th, 2014, 08:04 PM   #42
Lynn Cates
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Hello Tim. Thanks. Very good.

Written by a genuine Texan, no doubt. And more truth than poetry.

Cheers.
LC
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Old October 12th, 2014, 04:47 AM   #43
Phillip Walton
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Judge 3 wasn't How by any chance, no wonder he doesn't like Texas.
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Old October 12th, 2014, 09:55 AM   #44
Cris Malone
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I shouldn't have tried to read this while sitting in a deer stand trying to be quiet. The deer are snortin' at me and squirrels are barking. Might as well head to the barn. A friend just gave me some cayenne and Anaheim peppers last night. Passed a road kill coming in this morning. And they start selling beer at 12. Think I'll make some chili.

God bless Texas.
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Old October 12th, 2014, 11:06 AM   #45
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Good man, Chris.

I wasn't born in Texas but I got here as fast as I could.

Road kill, eh? You're in luck!

Texas Road-Kill Chili

Ingredients:

1 16 oz. can Contadina tomato sauce
1 tbsp. salt
1-3 tsps. oregano
4 lbs. fresh road-kill
2 beers or 750ml zinfindel
2 Jalapeno peppers (chopped)
2-4 tbsps. chili powder
4 cloves crushed garlic
1 tbsp. finely chopped green onions
1 tsp. black pepper
1 tbsp. cumin powder
2 tbsps. chopped bell pepper
(This is REAL Chili - - So, No... There Ain't No Beans !)

Grind up 4 pounds of fresh road-kill. (Note: sometimes, due to the condition of the road-kill, grinding up may not be necessary). Just about anything is acceptable (armadillo, rabbit, possum, chicken, unidentified...), but stay away from skunks since their odoriferousnous may have a negative effect on the final result. If you live in an area where there's not much highway traffic, or where urbanization has scared off all the critters and your neighbors keep their pets indoors, then you can use (all) the following meat as a substitute:

2 lbs. ground beef (chili grind)
1 lb. venison (chili grind) .. pork is ok
1 lb. ground Italian sausage
12 oz. Mexican chorrizo sausage
Mix all the meat in a large kettle. If using the "substitute" ingredients above, then cut open the chorrizo wrapping and squeeze out the contents into the mixture of the 4 lbs. of other meats. Brown the meat, stirring occasionally to mix well. Once the meat has browned, add the tomato sauce, beer (or wine) and all of the seasonings. It is a good idea at this early juncture to use only half of the chili pepper and oregano and reserve the rest until later so that you can season to your taste.


Cook over low-medium heat for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally to prevent sticking, then reduce heat to low and cover. Cook covered for 1 hour, stirring from time to time. Sample for taste, increase seasoning as desired, and cook on low for another hour, stirring occasionally.


Sample again and add additional cumin, chili pepper, oregano, Jalapenos or critters to suit your taste; turn off heat and place in the refrigerator over night. Reheat on the following day and serve. For an especially tasty presentation, serve up in bowls and sprinkle the top with chopped white onions and shredded Monterrey Jack and cheddar cheeses. Feeds 6 to 8. Enjoy!
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Old October 17th, 2014, 08:19 PM   #46
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Added a photo to the first post - finally - and some new verbiage.
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Old October 17th, 2014, 09:15 PM   #47
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Nice photo, Tim.
Thanks..
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Old October 18th, 2014, 11:33 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sam Flynn
I'll usually pep them up with a good helping of Naga or Trinidad Scorpion peppers
Pretty impressive, Sam.

I see hot sauces made with Jolokia 'Ghost' peppers and Trinidad Scorpion peppers, but I have never tried them; you CAN have too much of a good thing. Why anyone wants/needs peppers hotter than a habanero, other than for bragging rights, is a mystery. We had used a scattering of red habanero peppers and jalapeņo peppers for booth decoration, and afterwards I liquefied the habaneros and froze them into ice cubes for future use. They looked like frozen watermelon cubes. I tried a bit of a leftover shard and it was throat-searing hot.

When I said 'liquefied', that meant seeds and all.
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Old October 18th, 2014, 12:12 PM   #49
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This guy on the left ate too much Yankee chili...undercooked meat, Eyetalian peppers when they shoulda been Mexican...not enough garlic...yecch !
The fella on the right survived Texas chili and is all the better for it.

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Old October 18th, 2014, 02:23 PM   #50
Lynn Cates
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Hello Tim. Yes, too many peppers CAN have an odd effect on one's vision. (See photograph below.)

Cheers.
LC
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