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James Kelly Was the Broadmoor Escapee Jack The Ripper?

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Old August 31st, 2009, 04:26 PM   #11
Stephen Thomas
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Funny that Macnaghton never mentioned Kelly as a possibility, isn't it?
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Old August 31st, 2009, 05:51 PM   #12
Howard Brown
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Whats even more bizarre Stephen is that at lunch time today...thats exactly what I mentioned to Nina and I never thought of it before until Roy created this thread and Debra responded with her insights and of course you mentioned that first here, for what I think is the first time I've ever seen that in print. Very good of you to come up with it, because frankly, I would have forgotten to mention it....until 10 years later,as usual, on another thread... this is yet another example of how a lot of us seem to be thinking alike on the Forums on certain aspects within the Case. What if Macnaghten never heard of Kelly or his escape ? Is that possible?

Its very startling as well, when today Nina also asked me whether I ever remembered any asylum escapee in my newspaper trawling being mentioned. I gave it some thought and my answer was in the negative. Nina used to breathe those newspaper archives and she responded in kind. Thats a LOT of newspaper study on this little lady's part too.

Has Roy Corduroy found something here that has gone unmentioned ( at least as far as I know ) up until now????...that asylum escapees didn't get mentioned in the press UNTIL they were apprehended? This is alarming,I think, because the whole time the WM were underway, not one word of Kelly's escape leaked out.

Could there....a longshot here,maybe...could there have been others as well who didn't get the ink?

This might be a task for one or more of our researchers to look into. Great thread, Roy !
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Stephen... by the way,the same holds true in our time. I cannot remember reading about an escaped asylum patient until after he was apprehended.
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Old August 31st, 2009, 07:13 PM   #13
Celesta
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Even if the news was kept from the public, it still seems that Macnaghten, Anderson, or some of that bunch would have heard of Kelly's escape. They had to know he was dangerous. Could it be that because Kelly didn't live in the immediate vicinity of Whitechapel, Spitalfields, etc, during the time of the murders, he was less interesting as a potential Ripper suspect? The mother-in-law was under survellance, wasn't she? The investigators were expecting him to turn up at her house.
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Old August 31st, 2009, 09:29 PM   #14
Howard Brown
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Cellie:

That mother in law story is worth its own thread because its really strange on its own, isn't it ?

One element of his escape that would have made ME worry in early 1888 is that he seemed to have more of his ducks in order than the rank and file lunatic.
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Old August 31st, 2009, 09:54 PM   #15
Roy Corduroy
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Quote:
I've checked the British Library newspaper archives and there is no mention of the escape in 88 that I can see...
Thank you, Debra for looking into it.
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I also checked for other reports of escaped Broadmoor inmates and noticed several papers reporting an escape incident only after an inmate had been safely recaptured again, as in Marshall's case. Perhaps this was the policy?
I see. So in fact, secrecy may well have been the norm.

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Old September 1st, 2009, 10:25 AM   #16
Celesta
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Quote:
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Cellie:


One element of his escape that would have made ME worry in early 1888 is that he seemed to have more of his ducks in order than the rank and file lunatic.

Yes, and he managed to do it well enough to remain free for a very long time! Definitely not one of the rank and file lunatics.

I was thinking about what Stephen said. As a potential Ripper suspect, Kelly seemed to stay below the radar for some reason. Was he not named as a possible suspect because he escaped and wasn't caught, and they didn't want the public speculating on that? I also wondered if he wasn't taken seriously as a suspect, as far as we know, because the police were looking for a local man, and Kelly wasn't local enough.

Now that you mention it, the mother-in-law business was rather weird. I believe she knew he still had inheritance money and wanted to get her hands on it.
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Old May 12th, 2015, 12:36 PM   #17
Vincent Prochelo
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I don't understand why the press and/or the public would not be alerted to the escape of a convicted murderer from a lunatic asylum. Crazy.
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Old May 12th, 2015, 05:29 PM   #18
Anna Morris
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I think some of the silence about Kelly's escape could have had to do with Kelly escaping execution by being declared insane. That was still kind of a new law and there could have been a public backlash about a murderer being able to run loose. It's like the modern argument we have about capital punishment in the US. Some of us argue that convicts can be locked up for life. Others argue that they could escape or get out for some other reason and that the one sure thing about capital punishment is that THAT one murderer won't murder again.
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Old May 13th, 2015, 11:05 AM   #19
Vincent Prochelo
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Originally Posted by Anna Morris View Post
I think some of the silence about Kelly's escape could have had to do with Kelly escaping execution by being declared insane. That was still kind of a new law and there could have been a public backlash about a murderer being able to run loose. It's like the modern argument we have about capital punishment in the US. Some of us argue that convicts can be locked up for life. Others argue that they could escape or get out for some other reason and that the one sure thing about capital punishment is that THAT one murderer won't murder again.
Makes sense, thanks.
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