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James Kelly Was the Broadmoor Escapee Jack The Ripper?

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Old June 18th, 2014, 11:58 PM   #21
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Default The Standard, Monday, 25 June, 1883

THE STANDARD
Monday, 25th June, 1883
CLERKENWELL – Police-inspector Poule, of the G Division, reported to Mr. Barstow, the Magistrate at the Court, on Saturday afternoon, that the woman Sarah Ann Kelly, alleged to have been stabbed in the neck by her husband, James Kelly, at 21, Cottage-Lane, St. Luke’s, was in a dying state, almost all hopes having been given up of her recovery. – Mr. Barstow, accompanied by the Inspector and the Chief Clerk, at once drove to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, in order that the injured woman’s deposition might be taken down in writing. – When the Prisoner, James Kelly (who has only been married to his wife for a fortnight), was charged with the attempted murder on Friday, evidence was given by his mother-in-law, that in consequence of a quarrel with his wife he stabbed her under the left ear with a pocket knife, inflicting a deep wound. – The Prisoner stands remanded till next Friday.
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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Old June 18th, 2014, 11:59 PM   #22
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Default Morning post, monday, 25 june, 1883

THE MORNING POST
Monday, 25th June, 1883
CLERKENWELL – Police-Inspector Poule, of the G Division, reported that the woman Sarah Ann Kelly, alleged to have been stabbed in the neck by her husband, James Kelly, at 21 Cottage Lane, St. Luke’s, was in a dying state, almost all hopes having been given up of her recovery. – Mr. Barstow, accompanied by the Chief Clerk, at once drove to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital in order that the injured woman’s depositions might be taken in writing.


Transcript of an article found by Mike Covell
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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Old June 19th, 2014, 12:00 AM   #23
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Default Daily news, monday, 25 june, 1883

DAILY NEWS
Monday, 25th June, 1883
CLERKENWELL – THE ATTEMPTED WIFE MURDER – Police-Inspector Poule, of the G Division, reported to Mr. Barstow, the magistrate at the Court, on Saturday afternoon, that the woman Sarah Ann Kelly, alleged to have been stabbed in the neck by her husband, James Kelly, at 21 Cottage-Lane, St. Luke’s, was in a dying state, almost all hopes having been given up of her recovery. – Mr. Barstow, accompanied by the Inspector and the Chief Clerk, at once drove to St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, in order that the injured woman’s deposition might be taken down in writing. When the prisoner, James Kelly, (who has only been married to his wife a fortnight) was charged with the attempted murder on Friday, evidence was given by his mother-in-law that in consequence of a quarrel with his wife he stabbed her under the left ear with a pocket knife, inflicting a deep wound. – The prisoner stands remanded till next Friday.
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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Old June 19th, 2014, 12:01 AM   #24
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Default Reynold's newspaper, sunday, 24 june, 1883

REYNOLD’S NEWSPAPER
Sunday, 24th June, 1883
ATTEMPTED WIFE MURDER AT ST. LUKE’S
James Kelly, 23, an upholsterer, of 21, Cottage-Lane, City-Road, St. Luke’s, was at Clerkenwell Police-Court, on Friday, charged before Mr. Barstow with attempting to murder his wife, Sarah Ann Kelly, by stabbing her in the neck, at the above address, on Thursday night.
Police-Inspector Maynard said the prosecutrix was lying at ST. Bartholomew’s Hospital, and was too seriously injured to attend.
Mrs. Sarah Brider, mother-in-law to the prisoner, said that Kelly had only been married to his wife a little over a fortnight. She lived in the same house with them. On Thursday night they were all in the parlour, and the prisoner accused his with keeping the company of girls of loose character at Islington. There had for a day or two previously been a slight quarrel between them. She said, in reply, “I won’t live with you any longer; you are unkind and cruel.” The prisoner said, “You won’t leave me; I’ll stop you from that,” and added that he would “Knock her down.” Nothing further was said at the moment, but after the lapse of a few minutes he asked her to forgive him, and sat by her side on a couch. She said that she could not forgive him, and witness saw him put his arm round her neck and drag her head down to the floor. He then ran out of the room and his wife fell down on the carpet in a swoon, bleeding very much at the neck. A doctor was sent for, and she was conveyed to the hospital.
Dr. Rayner said that on the prisoner’s wife being admitted to the hospital she was in an unconscious state. She had a punctured wound below the left ear, nearly three inches deep. Her life was very much in danger.
The prisoner was taken into custody by the police on returning into the room. A pocket-knife was found on the floor with the blade broken sharp of from the handle.
Mr. Barstow remanded the prisoner.


Transcript of an article found by Mike Covell
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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Old June 19th, 2014, 12:02 AM   #25
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Default The STANDARD, SATURDAY, 23 JUNE, 1883

THE STANDARD
Saturday, 23rd June, 1883
--- POLICE INTELLIGENCE ---
CLERKENWELL – James Kelly, 23, an upholsterer, of Cottage-Lane, City-Road, St. Luke’s was charged before Mr. Barstow with attempting to murder his wife, Sarah Ann Kelly, by stabbing her in the neck, at the above address, on Thursday night. – Police-Inspector Maynard said the Prosecutrix was lying at St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, and was too seriously injured to attend. – Mrs. Sarah Brider, mother-in-law to the Prisoner, said that Kelly had only been married to his wife a little over a fortnight. She lived in the same house with them. On Thursday night they were all in the parlour, and the Prisoner accused his wife of keeping the company of girls of loose character at Islington. There had for a day or two previously been a slight quarrel between them. She said, in reply, “I won’t live with you any longer; you are unkind and cruel.” The Prisoner said, “You won’t leave me; I’ll stop you from doing that;” and added that he would “Knock her down.” Nothing further was said at the moment, but after the lapse of a few minutes he asked her to forgive him, and sat by her side on a couch. She said that she could not forgive him, and the Witness saw him put his arm round her neck and drag her head down to the floor. He then ran out of the room and his wife fell down on the carpet, in a swoon, bleeding very much at the neck. A doctor was sent for, and she was conveyed to the hospital. – Dr. Rayner said that on the Prisoner’s wife being admitted to the hospital she was in an unconscious state. She had a punctured wound below the left ear, nearly three inches deep. Her life was very much in danger. The Prisoner was taken into custody by the police on his returning into the room. A pocket-knife was found on the floor with the blade broken sharp off from the handle. – Mr. Barstow remanded the Prisoner.
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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Old June 19th, 2014, 12:03 AM   #26
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Default The morning post, saturday, 23 june, 1883

THE MORNING POST
Saturday, 23rd June, 1883
James Kelly, 23, an upholsterer, of 21, Cottage-Lane, City-Road, St. Luke’s, was charged with attempting to murder his wife, Sarah Ann Kelly, by stabbing her in the neck on Thursday night. – Police Inspector Maynard said the prosecutrix was lying in St. Bartholomew’s Hospital, and was too severely injured to attend. – Mrs. Sarah Brider, mother-in-law to the prisoner, said that Kelly had only been married a little over a fortnight. She lived in the same house with them. On Thursday night they were all in the parlour, and the prisoner accused his wife of keeping the company of girls of loose character. She said, in reply, “I won’t live with you any longer: you are unkind and cruel.” The prisoner said, “You won’t leave me; I’ll keep you from going,” and he added that he would “knock her down.” Nothing further was said at the moment, but after the lapse of a few minutes he asked her to forgive him, and sat by her side on a couch. She said she could not forgive him and witness saw him put his arm round her neck and drag her head down to the floor. He then ran out of the room, and his wife fell down on the carpet in a swoon, bleeding very much at the neck. A doctor was sent for and she was conveyed to the hospital. – Dr. Rayner said that on the prisoner’s wife being admitted to the hospital she was in an unconscious state. She had a punctured wound below the left ear, nearly three inches deep. Her life was in great danger. – Mr. Barstow remanded the prisoner.
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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Old June 19th, 2014, 12:04 AM   #27
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Default Times london, saturday, 2 august, 1883

Times London
Saturday, 2nd August, 1883
CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT, August 1
(Before MR. JUSTICE WATKIN WILLIAMS.) James Kelly, 23, upholsterer, was placed upon his trial upon an indictment charging him with the wilful murder of Sarah Ann Kelly. He pleaded “Not Guilty.”

Mr. Polandand Mr. Eyre Lloyd conducted the prosecution for the treasury; Mr. Mantagu Williams and Mr. Cavendish Bentinck appeared for the defence.

The opening statement for Mr. Poland and the evidence went to show that the prisoner had been lodging for about 16 months at No. 21, Cottage Lane, City-road. The house was occupied by a Mr. Ryder, his wife, and two daughters one of whom, the deceased, a young woman, 22 years of age, was married to the prisoner in June last. They did not, however, live comfortably together, and on June 18 the prisoner appeared to have taken up a knife and threatened the deceased. On June, 21 she returned home from her work, and went out again to meet the prisoner. A quarrel seemed to have taken place between them, and the prisoner threatened that he would “give her something” for walking in Upper-Street, Islington. They returned home together, and the deceased went into her bedroom and locked the door. A short time afterwards the prisoner burst the bedroom door open, and sat down beside her. An angry altercation took place between them, and the prisoner used a very offensive expression towards his wife. He afterwards appealed to her to forgive him for the name he had called her, and saying that he must go away. He again asked her to forgive him, but she repeated her refusal. The prisoner, thereupon, drew his knife, and inflicted two mortal wounds in her neck. The young woman was removed to the hospital, and the prisoner was taken into custody. The knife was subsequently found lying on the floor of the room with the blade broken. When taken into custody the accused said he did not know what he was about, and must have been mad. So serious were the injuries, inflicted upon the deceased that the police magistrate attended to take her deposition. She died on June 24 from the injuries she received. In due course a post mortem examination was made, and it was found that a wound had been inflicted three inches deep, the effect of which was to sever the spinal cord. When asked before the magistrate whether he had any statement to make, the prisoner said that he did it in his madness. He did not know what he was doing. He was led to do it by certain things said and done. He had loved his wife and loved her still. Subsequent to his arrest the prisoner wrote a letter to the deceased, which, however, never reached her, in which he gave utterance to many expressions of regard for her, asked her to write to him, and say how she was, and expressed contrition for what he had done. In a further communication addressed to the mother of the deceased, he urged that he had never intended to hurt her, and that on the day of the occurrence he had only taken the knife from his pocket for the purpose of frightening her, when something suddenly came over him which impelled him to inflict the wounds upon her.

Witnesses were called in support of the case for the prosecution, the principal one being Mrs. Sarah Ann Ryder, the mother of the deceased.

Being cross examined by Mr. Montagu Williams, for the defence, the witness said the deceased was a good, truthful and pious girl. She was very reserved, and never spoke to any one in the street. The prisoner always seemed very fond of his wife. He had complained of an access in his neck and pains in his head and since Christmas all the family had noticed that he was greatly changed.

The assistant surgeon of the House of Detention was called by the prosecution, and stated that he had had the prisoner under his observation for some time, and had conversed with him, but he could discover no signs of insanity about him.

Mr. Poland summed up the case for the prosecution, and addressed his argument with a view of controverting the theory of insanity which had been raised by the defence.

Mr. Montagu Williams, in addressing the Court for the defence, said before the prisoner could be convicted of the charge upon which he stood arraigned the Crown must establish that he had intended to kill and murder the deceased. The painful duty had been cast upon the jury of deciding whether the prisoner, who was but in the spring time of life, should be confined during Her Majesty's pleasure for the remainder of his life, or whether or not the quality of the act done was such that it was reduced to manslaughter, and they had to determine by their verdict whether the prisoner should be doomed to be a slave for the remainder of his life or whether he should expiate his crime by a felon's death on the scaffold. Referring to the circumstances of the case, counsel asked what motive could there have been on the part of the prisoner for the commission of the crime? The whole of the prisoner's acts and words, in having suspicion with reference to his wife's conduct, which were absolutely without foundation, proved conclusively that he had been labouring under a distempered imagination. The deceased's conduct was shown to have been of unexampled propriety, and with the evidence of the mother and the letters could the jury believe that the prisoner was sufficiently master of himself to be able to know the nature and quality of the act he committed? Did they believe that he had intended to take her life? Counsel commented upon the fact of the prisoner having suffered from pains in the head arising from an abcess, and urged that it was evidence that the prisoner had acted under an uncontrollable impulse arising from a temporary aberration of intellect. If the prisoner was morally irresponsible for the act he was entitled to be acquitted on the ground of insanity, the result of such a verdict being that for the remainder of his days he would be detained at the Queen's pleasure, or if it was not a malicious or unpremeditated act, but one committed in a paroxysm of passion, it was open to them to find a verdict of manslaughter.

MR. JUSTICE WATKIN WILLIAMS summed up the case at some length, directing the jury upon the law as applicable to the case.

The jury retired to consider their verdict, and after an hour's absence returned into Court, finding the prisoner Guilty but adding a recommendation to mercy.

The prisoner being asked in the usual whether he had anything to say why sentence of death should not be passed upon him, said he should like to speak to Mrs. Ryder in the witness box.

MR. JUSTICE WATKIN WILLIAMS said he was afraid he could not do that on the present occasion.

The prisoner then said as a matter of justice he desired to warn others against being deceived. He then made a somewhat incoherent statement with reference to his wife and other persons. When he stabbed her he was out of his mind, and he was sorry for it. He prayed God to forgive him, and felt sure that He had already forgiven him. For that reason he felt that he should like to live in order that he might serve God; but as the jury had decided that he must die he hoped the Lord would give him strength to show them that even a sinner like himself knew how to die.

MR. JUSTICE WATKIN WILLIAMS then assumed the black cap, and proceeded to pass sentence, remarking that the jury had found the prisoner guilty of the wilful murder of his wife upon evidence which admitted of no rational doubt as to his guilt. The prisoner was urged by some feeling of jealous or anger or by some bad feeling of self reproach on his part, and he plunged a deadly weapon with such violence into his unfortunate wife’s neck as to cause her death. Nor could he see a single circumstance in the case to reduce the criminality of the act in the slightest degree from an act of willful murder of which the prisoner had been found guilty. The jury, however, had recommended him to mercy, and he would take care that that recommendation should be forwarded to the proper quarter, but if anything would affect its being attended to it would be the statements which the prisoner had just made with reference to the deceased and other persons. He would not aggravate the agony of feeling which the prisoner must be undergoing by moralizing on the crime or by preaching to him on that day, but would confine himself to passing upon him the sentence of the law. The learned Judge then formally passed sentence of death upon the prisoner, who on being removed, said he was innocent.




THIS ARTICLE CAN BE FOUND IN JAMES KELLY'S HOME OFFICE FILES
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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Old June 19th, 2014, 12:06 AM   #28
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Default Evening standard, 21 january, 1906

“THE EVENING STANDARD”
21st JANUARY, 1906
AN ESCAPED LUNATIC.
CURIOUS SEQUEL TO AN OLD MURDER TRIAL

In the Lancashire Chancery Court, sitting at St. George’s Hall, yesterday before the Vice Chancellor of the County Palatine (Mr. Leigh Clare) a summons was called on for hearing asking for the payment out of court of a sum of £351, in the matter of Sarah Allan, deceased.

Mr. John Rutherford informed his Honor that there was a question in the case as to whether the residuary legatee as a James Kelly, who had disappeared but under such circumstances that the court could not be asked to presume his death. Some years ago Kelly was tried at the Liverpool Assizes for the murder of his wife and eventually condemned to confinement in a criminal lunatic asylum. From that asylum in 1888 he escaped; he was at that time 27 years of age. The rule would appear to be that when a man disappeared under such circumstances that it was not likely that he would be heard of again, the fact that he was not heard of, did not amount to a presumption of death. Mr. Sampson the applicant in the present matter, was a mortgagee for costs which had been incurred, a portion of them in connection with the administration of the will of Mrs. Allan and others in reference to Kelly’s defence on the capital charge; the claim, said Mr. Rutherford, would nearly absorb the amount in court.

An affidavit which Mr. Rutherford proceeded to read, stated that it was believed that after his escape from the asylum Kelly went to South America and subsequently returned to Liverpool, but had succeeded in evading capture, and since 1895 nothing had been heard of him. Counsel passed on to argue from authorities which, he contended, constituted a precedent in such matters.

Mr. Cochrane who appeared for the next-of-kin submitted that it was very difficult to take the case as one of implication, having regard to the express gift in the will.

The Vice Chancellor in giving his decision held that James Kelly if he were alive could take the property absolutely and that his mortgage was entitled to take out of the money, what was the amount due on the mortgage.




THIS ARTICLE CAN BE FOUND IN KELLY'S HOME OFFICE FILES
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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Old June 19th, 2014, 12:10 AM   #29
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Default Liverpool evening express, 22nd january 1906

A30356 / 27
LIVERPOOL EVENING EXPRESS
22ND JANUARY, 1906

DISAPPEARANCE OF AN INSANE CRIMINAL.
Interesting Chancery Action

At the Chancery Court of Lancashire today, before Vice Chancellor Leigh Clare, a summons was heard asking for the payment out of court of £351 in the matter of Sarah Allan, deceased.

Mr John Rutherford said there was a question as to whether the residuary legatee was a James Kelly, who had disappeared but under such circumstances that the court could not be asked to presume his death. Kelly was tried at the Liverpool Assizes some years ago for the murder of his wife, and was condemned to confinement in a criminal lunatic asylum. In 1888 he escaped from the asylum, he being then 27 years old. The rule appeared to be that when a man disappeared under such circumstances that it was not likely he would be again be heard of, the fact that he was not heard of did not amount to a presumption of his death. Mr. Sampson the applicant was a mortgagee of costs which had been incurred, a portion in reference to Kelly’s defense on the murder charge. Kelly was illegitimate. The claim would nearly absorb the amount in court.

An affidavit read by Mr. Rutherford stated that it was believed that after escaping from the asylum Kelly went to South America and subsequently returned to Liverpool. He had succeeded in evading capture, and nothing had been heard of him since 1895.

Mr Cochrane, for the next of kin, contended that terms of the will precluded the payment out of court of the sum named.

The Vice-Chancellor said that in the class of cases to which Mr. Rutherford had referred him the court had gone as far in the matter of speculation as it was possible to go, and in the present case he had no hesitation in following those cases. He held that James Kelly, if he were now alive, could take the sum absolutely and that his mortgagee was entitled to take out of the money the amount due on mortgage; this point to be settled with the registrar.

Mr. Rutherford undertook to make further inquiries during the next fortnight.

The Vice Chancellor said that if they could satisfactorily ask him to assume that Kelly was dead in 1902 he would do so. He would not direct an account of what was due to Mr. Sampson unless there was somebody to represent Kelly.




THIS ARTICLE CAN BE FOUND IN JAMES KELLY'S HOME OFFICE FILES. AN ANONYMOUS LETTER WAS SENT TO THE LIVERPOOL POLICE SAYING THAT KELLY WAS LIVING IN THE CALEDONIAN MARKET AREA. THE LETTER WAS SENT AFTER THE WRITER HAD READ THIS PARTICULAR ARTICLE.
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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Old June 19th, 2014, 12:12 AM   #30
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Default Daily mail, 14 february 1927

Daily Mail
14th February, 1927

A MURDERER’S DREAD OF DYING ALONE.
– VOLUNTARY RETURN TO CAPTIVITY –
AFTER ESCAPE 39 YEARS AGO.

From OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT
Wokingham, Berkshire
Sunday.

A footsore, half-starved, wizened little man with grey hair and wrinkled face walked up to Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum late on Friday night and begged to be allowed to enter.

He declared that he escaped from the institution 39 years ago, and after roving all over the world had come back to set his conscience at rest and die in peace. The attendant summoned an official, who was incredulous when the story was told and a telephone message was sent to the police at Wokingham, 4 ½ miles away, asking them to remove a lunatic! The man was brought to Wokingham and charged with being a lunatic wandering abroad.

The story he told of his friendless flight from justice, the ever-haunting fear that he might fall into the hands of the police, and the constant dread as old age approached that he might die alone and unknown, beats any scenario ever written for the film millionaires.

MURDER OF 1883
He declared that he was James Kelly, who in July 1883 was sentenced to death at Old Bailey for the murder of his wife. At that time he was 23 years of age and was an upholsterer. He was under the delusion that his wife had been associating with other men and in a fit of passion stabbed her.

At his trial he was defended by the famous Criminal Lawyer, Mr. Montagu Williams, who made a passionate appeal to the jury to find Kelly insane. This plea did not succeed, but the jury added a recommendation to mercy. Shortly before the day fixed for his execution he was reprieved and sent to Broadmoor “during her Majesty’s Pleasure”.

At the asylum he harboured a grievance that he was being unjustly treated and plotted to escape. In his spare time he made a key to fit his cell and on January 23, 1888 nearly five years after he arrived at the Criminal Lunatic Asylum, he walked out and disappeared.

There was a widespread hue and cry but no trace could be found of Kelly, who however, was hiding close to the Asylum.

Later he made his way to the east coast. At one port he was working in a ship when a policeman recognized him and went aboard to arrest him. Kelly however saw the constable and again disappeared.

WORLD TRAVELS
A few weeks later, he says, he worked his passage in a Channel boat to France and earned a precarious livelihood in the Montmartre quarter of Paris. He returned to England and then went to Rotterdam. Later he became a seaman, and as such travelled all over the world.

Some weeks ago he worked his passage from New Orleans to Liverpool whence he tramped to London. Since then he has walked the streets, getting a few pence by doing odd jobs.

“I have no friends and am all alone in the world” he said. “I have wandered all these years feeling that I am a fugitive who might be pounced on by any policeman I passed. I am getting feeble now from the constant fear and I dreaded the idea of dying alone.”

When Kelly appeared before the magistrates yesterday he appealed to be allowed to end his days at Broadmoor. Later in the day an order from the Home office arrived and Kelly was removed to the asylum, where he is in a ward near Ronald True.

THIS ARTICLE CAN BE FOUND IN KELLY'S HOME OFFICE FILES
__________________
JAMES KELLY
(Friday, April 20, 1860 - Thursday, September 17,1929)

HOME OFFICE FILES: H.O. 144/10064
BROADMOOR HOSPITAL: File 3510 KELLY, J.
BERKSHIRE RECORD OFFICE: D/H14/D2/2/1/1167, D/H14/D2/2/1/3510

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