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Old October 11th, 2014, 07:48 AM   #11
Howard Brown
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Paul:
Manoshevitz, you need some help in the mundo culinary ! I feel your gastric pain, sir !
I'll send three brick of scrapple over toot sweet.

Maybe Tim can send you his prize winning chili recipe....or better yet, even make you a gallon and send it in the mail.
His stuff will make your jimmy thicker.
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Old October 11th, 2014, 08:22 AM   #12
Cris Malone
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There used to be a little beer joint my Dad went to after work called the Snack Bar. The whole place was no bigger than a railroad box car. The bar and stools ran down the length of it with a nickel pinball machine at the far end.

On Saturday, they had chili and it was made similar to How's favorite - finely ground beef (I guess it was beef) little chopped onions and peppers...more like a soup but it was great with crumbled up saltines in it. Found out the secret ingredient was just a can of Campbell's tomato soup.

My Dad would take me there on Saturday and while he had a couple of longneck Buds I'd perch up on a stool, play the pinball machine and eat at least two bowls of that chili with a cold Dr. Pepper.

Weren't too hot for a youngun like me but rich and flavorful.

I got pretty good at that pinball machine, too. Simple pleasures of childhood. They don't let kids do things like that with their fathers anymore. Dad goes to jail for DUI and you go to a foster home.
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Old October 11th, 2014, 08:27 AM   #13
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There used to be a little beer joint my Dad went to after work called the Snack Bar. The whole place was no bigger than a railroad box car. The bar and stools ran down the length of it with a nickel pinball machine at the far end.
-Chili Con Carne Malone-

Cris...people in the D.C. area will recall those little box car length road side diners known as Ollie's Trolley. Great grub !



Had a terrible experience at one in 1981. My buddy's car keys to his '72 Impala were stolen while we were inside ordering chili dogs. After waiting at least 5 hours for a key replacement, we were able to leave D.C. We were there to buy fireworks since they were and still are illegal in Philly.
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Old October 11th, 2014, 08:48 AM   #14
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Well I'll be damned. The name of the owner of the "Snack Bar" was Ollie Thomas.
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Old October 11th, 2014, 09:25 AM   #15
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The Beta version of 'Pray for Death' chili, due to the surprising interest.

3 lbs beef sirloin tips, stew meat, or cubed round steak
1.5 lbs fresh ground pork (or cubed pork loin)
1/4 cup olive oil
3 large white onions, chopped
4 cloves garlic, minced
6 fresh jalapeno peppers, seeded and chopped
2 serrano peppers, minced, with seeds
2 red bell peppers, chopped
4 long green peppers (such as Anaheim), chopped
35 oz canned whole Italian tomatoes (must be Italian!), crushed
1 8-oz can tomato paste
3 bay leaves
1 tbls crushed Mexican oregano
1 tbls sea salt
2 tbls cumin
2 tbls paprika
1 tbls red wine vinegar
1/4 cup blackstrap molasses
1 tbls fresh ground black pepper
2 tbls red pepper
6 tbls chili powder
2 tsp dry mustard
1 cup beef broth
1 pint of good beer such as Shiner Bock
6 oz tequila
4 tbls masa harina (masa flour)
4 oz unsweetened Baker's chocolate, grated
cup warm water


Cut meat into one-half inch cubes and brown in two tablespoons of olive oil with one-half the chopped garlic. Take beef from the skillet, reserving the cooking juices. Brown the pork in one tablespoon of olive oil, stirring and breaking it up as it cooks (if using ground pork). Drain and discard the fat. Mix cooked pork with cooked beef in a ten-quart kettle.

In skillet, saute chopped onions with the remaining garlic, chopped jalapenos, serranos, bell peppers, and long peppers in the remaining olive oil. Then add to the meat.

Place the pot on low burner and add crushed tomatoes. Add tomato paste, bay leaves, salt, cumin, oregano, vinegar, molasses, black pepper, chili powder, red pepper, and dry mustard. Then add one-half cup of the reserved beef cooking liquid, beef broth, tequila, and stout to the pot. Simmer slowly uncovered for four hours, stirring frequently to prevent scorching. Mix the masa with the warm water and stir into pot. Simmer for 15 minutes. Stir in grated chocolate and simmer for an additional hour. Sample frequently, and add warm water or beer to adjust consistency.

For a hotter chili, add a few more jalapenos and/or serrano peppers and/or red pepper. This recipe yields about one and a half gallons of Texas Red.


This is the original recipe but not the one I follow, which is not written down anywhere and is now considerably different from this one. In competition chili, vegetables are not visible, so I liquefied them, seeds and all, in a Vitamix.

The trick with chili is to make hot chili that tastes good. I saw Howard's comments on there being no such thing as bad Texas chili, but that is not true. Two of the 12 batches were so bad tasting as to be inedible - I kid you not. The chili I make is very good tasting, although I did tone the heat down quite a bit for the general population. I made a double batch which had 4 pounds of cubed chuck steak, 4 pounds of chili-grind brisket, 2 pounds of cubed pork loin, and 2 pounds of ground pork. All with lots of odd peppers that I obtained from a Mexican grocery store.
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Old October 11th, 2014, 10:13 AM   #16
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My first thought was jeez that's a lot of peppers...but then I read closer, saw the meat quantities, and skimmed down to the bit where you say it makes about one and a half gallons...I assume you don't eat that at a single sitting!

Cheers

Dave
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Old October 11th, 2014, 10:22 AM   #17
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I like the idea of adding a little blackstrap molasses. Gonna try this.
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Old October 11th, 2014, 10:54 AM   #18
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Paul, send me the mashed potato and tuck into some - er - lovely chilli and curry instead. You know it makes sense.
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Old October 11th, 2014, 11:05 AM   #19
Lynn Cates
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Hello Tim. Hmm, no offense, but jalapenos are for wimps. Surely that should read "habaneras"?

Cheers.
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Old October 11th, 2014, 11:27 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynn
Hmm, no offense, but jalapenos are for wimps. Surely that should read "habaneras"?
Habaneros, my good man, habaneros.

I do usually liquefy a couple of red habaneros to add in the mix, but too-hot chili does poorly in competition. It was almost too hot anyway, as all the chili powders I have are 'HOT'. I need to pick up some 'MILD' for future competitions.

I used a mix of New Mexican hot red chili powder I got in Santa Fe, smoked serrano pepper chili powder, and some chipotle chili powder. Very good taste. I also use smoked paprika, which gives a light smoky aftertaste that is prized and sought after. My secret ingredient is Mozambique Peri Peri, which is a fiery hot meat rub..
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