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Old November 26th, 2010, 03:43 PM   #1
admin tim
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Default Working Police Revolvers

Inspector Swanson's .22 toy revolver notwithstanding, just what might Abberline and other hardcore police have carried during the hunt for JTR?


Pistol Revolver .455 inch Mk IV Webley


This is also likely the weapon, "old service revolver", that would have been packed by Dr. Watson on his dangerous sojourns with Sherlock Holmes. Holmes might have carried one as well, as anyone in the Victorian Era could have bought them. The .455 cartridge was nowhere near today's .44 Special or .44 Magnum calibres, which is why it took Sherlock Holmes an entire cylinder full of them to bring down the Hound of the Baskervilles at point-blank range. One shot from my .44 Magnum Redhawk would have settled that creature's hash at 100 yards.



Pistol Revolver .44 inch (British Bulldog)


Here we see the famous British Bulldog revolver. In the 1880s, revolvers were produced based on the Webley designed pocket revolver known as 'The British Bulldog'. These early revolvers were of a large .44 calibre. The cylinder is chambered for 5 shots. This model became so popular that it was chambered in other, smaller calibres, to reduce size and weight.


Pistol Revolver 7.65 mm (Bulldog Type)



Pistol Revolver 7.65 mm (Prince Albert Bulldog)




Pistol Revolver 7.65 mm (Bulldog Type)




Pistol Revolver 7.65 mm (Bulldog Type)


Of course, there were many other such weapons available for police and the masses in the LVP, and a better sampling of these may be found at http://www.rememuseum.org.uk/arms/pistols/armpr.htm
http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/top...lldog_revolver
http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/showthread.php?t=51114

You may also be interested in http://www.manatarmsbooks.com/layman.html


Although the Bulldog was available in large calibres, its construction was weak and so the cartridges were commensurately low-powered, whatever the calibre.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 06:01 PM   #2
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I wonder if the Bull Dog could handle a smokeless round. Anyway, in its day, this double-action revolver sold for as little as $9.00 brand new.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 06:28 PM   #3
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Yeah, Stan, cordite was already in use in the UK, having superseded black powder there in the 1870's.

They were cheap, even for the day, and my 1897 Sears Catalog reprint shows .32 calibre revolvers could be had then for as little as $2.00 plus shipping, which would have been about $0.10 extra.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 06:40 PM   #4
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Have a bit of a soft spot for these revolvers, lovely pieces of hardware. Deactivated revolvers from the period fetch a few hundred pounds these days.
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Old November 27th, 2010, 04:43 AM   #5
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Hi All,
I thought this might interest you:
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Old November 27th, 2010, 09:01 AM   #6
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Yes, inflation. When I was a kid in the 1950s the Sears & Roebuck catalog had revolvers for as little as something like $12 (and Saturday Night Specials were even cheaper). I don't know what brand they were but you could order them and have the mailman bring them right to the house with no questions asked. The JFK assassination ruined that. In 1925, you could order a machine gun and have it delivered.

This month's (December) American Rifleman has an article about the British Bull Dog
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Old November 27th, 2010, 10:10 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stan Reid
This month's (December) American Rifleman has an article about the British Bull Dog
The article that Stan mentions was the inspiration for this thread.
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Old March 9th, 2014, 07:05 AM   #8
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Old March 9th, 2014, 09:46 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave James View Post
Hi All,
I thought this might interest you:
Horrible cheap and nasty Belgian pin fire revolver, more dangerous to the shooter than the shootee.
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Old December 2nd, 2014, 04:57 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by admin tim View Post
...
Pistol Revolver .455 inch Mk IV Webley

This is also likely the weapon, "old service revolver", that would have been packed by Dr. Watson on his dangerous sojourns with Sherlock Holmes. Holmes might have carried one as well, as anyone in the Victorian Era could have bought them. The .455 cartridge was nowhere near today's .44 Special or .44 Magnum calibres, which is why it took Sherlock Holmes an entire cylinder full of them to bring down the Hound of the Baskervilles at point-blank range. One shot from my .44 Magnum Redhawk would have settled that creature's hash at 100 yards...

In a JTR fiction novel I just finished, one of my characters is using a revolver hence I needed to do a bit of research to choose an appropriate concealable firearm. In doing so, I found that the .455 Webly Mk IV was introduced in 1899 and adopted by the British Army the same year.

Having been an Army Surgeon, Watson most likely would have used a 4 inch .455 Webly Mk I (introduced in 1887) which he would have preferred to Webly's 5 1/2 inch Number 5 Army Express (1878) both used by the British Army and adapated to receive the .455 Enfield Mark II Regulation Service cartridge.

While Doyle was serving as a 'med' during the Boer war, he carried a .476 WG Model 1892 Army revolver which had a .476 bullet on a .455 shell! Since it had a 6 inch bullet, he probably wouldn't 'lend' it to Watson.

On the other hand, Holmes when not smoking his pipe could have used the 4 1/2 inch .450 Second Model Adam's Revolver also easily concealable and adopted by the British Army in 1872. It's said that this revolver was also part of Doyle's firearm collection.

Then again, I'm speculating and hope not have created another source of endless controversy. LOL

Cheers,
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